Monday, 27 August 2012

Hello from South Korea!

We are in 6th grade at elementary school in Seoul. You can call us Hansik (한식). This means Korea food. We study half the day in Korean and half the day in English at our school. It is private school so we pay for lunch but at public school in Seoul all student get free lunch.

We eat lunch at 12pm everyday in the cafeteria. Everyday there is rice, soup, a main dish, and some side dishes. We can drink water if we want. On some special day there is juice. We have to eat everything before we can go. We can have more food if we want. We don’t like many of the food in the cafeteria. Our favorites are fried chicken and noodle soup.


Today’s lunch was white rice, spinach soybean paste soup (시금치 된장국, sigeumchi doenjangguk), kimchi (김치 it is cabbage fermented with spicy red sauce), kim (김 dried seaweed), and dwaeji bulgogi (돼지 불고기) was the main dish. Dwaeji bulgogi is pork, spicy red sauce, and cabbage. It is kind of like stiry fry.

Food-o-meter- 7/10
Health rating- 9/10 (Korean food is healthy)
Bites- (Teacher’s Note: I forgot to tell them to count! I’ll remind them tomorrow!)
Courses- Main, Soup, 2 sides
Price- About 2,500 won ($2.50 US)
Pieces of hair- 0!

(Teacher’s Note for the picture: The students are not allowed cameras or phones during school hours so I took the picture. Because of this, the portion size is slightly larger than what is given to the students.)

We were very happy when we learned about Mary’s Meals. In our school we have a market one time a year. We sell things we make and give the money to an orphanage. We think it is very important that kids help other kids.

16 comments:

  1. Hello Hansik.
    What a delicious looking lunch! And very healthy! I haven't had kimchi before but I would like to try it. Everything else in your lunch is familiar to me.
    I look forward to more posts from you this week.
    :)

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  2. What is that black stuff made of?

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    Replies
    1. Unless I'm very mistaken that's the dried seaweed. It's lovely!

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    2. Renda is correct, that is the dried seaweed.

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    3. Renda is correct; that is the dried seaweed!

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  3. Oh, that looks so good! I'm American, but my mother is from Seoul, so I think I might need to eat some Korean food tonight! I could eat kimchi and kim bap every day!

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  4. Korean seaweed is very popular in Japan! Do you eat it with your rice or on it's own? (I've never been sure about how it's actually done in Korea). :)

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    Replies
    1. Usually it is wrapped around rice, but it is also tasty on its own.

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  5. yep one of the best so far, i must now try Korean food.

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  6. yes, looks like one of the best so far, i must now try Korean food as it looks very tasty.

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  7. "We think it is very important that kids help other kids." Oh, that just warms my heart. If only every adult felt this way too.

    VEG thank you for sharing your site with other students from around the globe. Despite the varied foods, it has been SO interesting to see how very similar we all are.

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  8. Hi Martha. I'm writing to let you know that you've inspired a 13 y.o. Brazilian girl to create a Facebook page to discuss her public school infrastructural problems. This is the title of the article in which I found about it: ¨No Facebook, estudante de 13 anos narra rotina de problemas de escola pública¨. Several improvements have taken place at her school already. Keep up the good work! All the best.

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  9. Yay! Korean food~ it's very nice to see Korean food here~ I love soybean paste soup and stew along with kimchi stew~ They are heavenly when cooked right!

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  10. Hello South Korea,

    Great first post, looking forward to the rest of the week.

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